Meet Sara Radin
 

Sara Radin

Youth Culture Editor at WSGN & WriterGreenpoint

Based in Brooklyn, NY, Sara Radin is a writer and curator. Full time, she is the Youth Culture Editor for WGSN, where she consults global brands on consumer trends for Millennials and Generation Z. Outside of work, Sara does memoir writing and curates pop-up art events and workshops. She is the co-founder of It's Not Personal, a collaborative project, growing anthology and collective inspired by the female dating experience. Previously, her personal writing has been published by Bust Magazine, Huffington Post and Thought Catalog. She also teaches the pre-college program at the Fashion Institute of Technology and is currently a mentor for Girls Write Now.

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STREETSTYLE DETAILS: Sweater, beyond retro ; skirt, topshop ; backpack, amalia boutique ; Boots, Urban Outfitters ; Sunglasses, Ray BanS


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I was always super creative growing up - I tried every artistic medium under the sun but never felt like I found my one true calling. I went to art school because I knew I wanted to be in a creative environment, but still struggled to find my place there. Junior year of college, I ended up interning at Ralph Lauren, thanks to a connection. I was doing something totally un-creative there, helping the trim production team work with the factories overseas to produce the buttons and buckles that go on the clothing.
I’ve never been one for sticking with a routine but on an ideal morning, I try to get up early with ample time to get ready for work and do some personal writing or reading. I also like to schedule a coffee meeting before I head into the office. I love starting the day off by doing something for me or by having an inspiring conversation with a potential new collaborator. However, on a typical day, I wake up, do a quick check on Instagram to see what I missed while I was sleeping, jump in the shower, pick out an outfit, throw on some lipstick and run out the door.
However, I got to sit in on meetings and discovered a department that felt very in line with my interests and skills. It’s called Concept Design. Not that many companies have it but the role entails working with the Creative Director of the line to create a narrative for every fashion collection, interpret trends, as well as incorporate the rich heritage of the brand. I started shadowing the Concept Designer on the team at RL and immediately knew that’s what I wanted to do after college. However, the opportunities are far and few between since it’s a very niche role, so after senior year I interned at Coach in handbag design until I landed a position as a Concept Designer for Converse. I worked there for three years, and now I work on the editorial side of trend forecasting as the Youth Culture Editor for WGSN.
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When I was working at Converse, I started organizing company craft hours, field trips for the design team, and a monthly employee exhibition program, which gave everyone in the company a chance to show their personal artwork around the office. Outside of that, I also curated a group show with a friend who was working at the Brooklyn Museum at the time. When I made the difficult decision to move on from my first job, I decided it was time to start building my own creative identity outside of my professional life. I started with a passion project called cultureisland, in which I interviewed and collaborated with emerging artists and designers on pop-up events for two years. I think my most unique one was an art show at a Montreal deli with Sarah Osborne, an artist who paints pictures of food. It was a lot of work doing the project with a full-time job and I had to sacrifice much of my social life but in the process, I met so many interesting people, forged my own community in New York and learned to see value in my own artistic practice. Now, I really love the adult life I’ve built.
From there, I moved onto my current project, It’s Not Personal, which is a female dating collective and growing anthology that I run with a friend, Vanessa Gattinella. This project stemmed from a personal break-up, which inspired me to start writing poems about guys I’ve dated. A year later, we’ve received over 100 submissions from all over the world, we host workshops at the New Women Space in East Williamsburg, and we run a monthly column with Bust Magazine Online. Our ultimate goal is to curate a large-scale exhibition and publish a book of art and writing inspired by the global female dating experience. We’re still accepting submissions of art and writing, which can be sent to itsnotpersonalnyc@gmail.com!
As the Youth Culture Editor for WGSN, I forecast and write about consumer trends for Millennials and Generation Z. Trend forecasting requires a mixture of insatiable curiosity, the hunger to ask questions and know more, and the ability to pick up on trends before they hit the mainstream. Personally, I’ve always been interested in what young people and emerging creatives are doing, and how that reflects our larger culture. A lot of this job is connecting the dots, and creating opportunities for brands to tap into growing markets. I spend a lot of my time inspiration hunting on social media, reading/researching a ton, and getting out to see art, films, and music. I also find brainstorming ideas and connecting with others to be the most inspiring parts of this job. This role is so innate to my being, it’s cool to look back and realize I was a trend forecaster before I even knew what it was!
I would say my style is eclectic and always evolving. Some days I wear all black, and other days I’ll wear something pretty out there. On any given day, I like to wear whatever I feel good in. I typically only shop vintage, or try to support emerging designers. I especially try to shop local stores around my neighborhood, Greenpoint, Brooklyn. My favorites are Awoke, Mirth, Fox & Fawn, and Walk the West, which just opened a storefront. I also love to vintage shop when I travel, it’s fun to see all the different stores, meet the owners and check out their unique selections. I collect clothes as if they are souvenirs of journeys I’ve taken. I have also been collecting vintage bandanas for awhile now, I have some from all over the world.
Sara's favorite books

Sara's favorite books

 
 
You’ll Grow Out Of It is a memoir by Amy Schumer’s head writer, Jessi Klein, it’s super honest, funny and raw. I hope to write a book like that some day.
Top, UNIF ; Pants, Vintage

Top, UNIF ; Pants, Vintage

 
 
Top, UNIF ; Pants, Vintage ; Glasses, Warby Parker

Top, UNIF ; Pants, Vintage ; Glasses, Warby Parker

I wear my great uncle’s opal and gold pinky ring almost every day. It’s really heavy and pretty odd looking but I love it. I never got to meet him sadly because he passed away before I was born but my middle name is after him. I love wearing hand-me-down jewelry that has a history behind it. It’s really the only jewelry I wear. I’m very sentimental in that sense. For me, it’s like carrying your loved ones around with you wherever you go.
Grow out your eyebrows! Thick and natural eyebrows are so beautiful. I had been plucking/waxing/threading mine since I was twelve, until I was inspired to let them go natural thanks to Glossier’s Boy Brow product.
During the day, I’m a very high energy person and I’m constantly overloading on inspiration, so settling down is really important once I get home. In order to calm down at night, I either spend some time meditating on my balcony, or I take a hot shower, sit at the bottom of my tub, and breathe in the steam. Then, I’ll watch an old episode of mindless television such as Gilmore Girls, Parenthood or Downton Abbey.
Shoes from left to right: Timberland ; Topshop ; Vagabond ; Vans

Shoes from left to right: Timberland ; Topshop ; Vagabond ; Vans

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RECOMMENDATIONS

 

✓ My two favorite areas of New York are Greenpoint and the Lower East Side. In Greenpoint, I'd recommend Maman for brunch, Littleneck Outpost for coffee, Word for browsing/buying books, and all the vintage clothing stores I listed above. Then, I'd recommend Adaptations for home goods and Homecoming next door for plants. Also, I'm obsessed with the local 99cent stores. Sounds weird, but I find them super inspiring and they are also super cheap! 

✓ On the Lower East Side, check out Chinatown Soup for art and Cafe Henrie for brunch. A few of my friends used to own cute stores on Orchard Street, which have sadly closed down recently.

 

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